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Transistor kills the radio star?

A rádio convencional não se ressente do consumo digital?

According to the latest study by Arbitron and Edison Media Research, The Infinite Dial 2007: Radio’s Digital Platforms, consumers are continuing to explore radio in all its digital platforms—Online Radio, Satellite Radio, HD Radio™,  and audio podcasting—while maintaining a broad use of AM/FM radio.

* AM/FM radio continues to have a big impact on people’s lives. The study asked consumers to rate the impact different digital audio platforms has on their lives. Nearly one in five (19 percent) consumers said radio has a big impact on their lives; ranking second only to mobile phones (35 percent) as the audio platform/device that has the biggest impact on the lives of its users.

* Those who listen to digital radio platforms do not spend less time listening to AM/FM radio. Among all persons 12 and older who participated in the study, the average time spent listening per day to AM/FM radio was 2 hours, 37 minutes compared with 2 hours, 45 minutes a day among those who use radio’s newer digital platforms (listened to online radio in the last month, or subscribe to satellite radio, or have ever listened to an audio podcast).

* The weekly Internet radio audience remains steady over the past year at an estimated 29 million. Eleven percent of the US population age 12 and older have listened to Internet radio in the past week; 16 percent of persons age 18-34 and 14 percent of persons 18-49 have done so.»

«Contrary to commonly held beliefs, people who listen to digital radio platforms do not spend less time listening to AM/FM radio. Some industry insiders assume that people who use new digital platforms listen less to AM/FM radio. Once again, we find that people who use digital audio platforms do NOT listen less to AM/FM radio. Among respondents in our study, the average time spent listening per day to AM/FM radio was 2 hours, 37 minutes compared with 2 hours, 45 minutes a day among those who use radio's new digital platforms (listened to online radio in the last month, or subscribe to satellite radio, or have ever listened to an audio podcast). Despite the growth reported in alternatives, such as the iPod, online radio and satellite radio, the time spent listening to AM/FM radio by users of digital radio platforms has not changed versus a year ago.» (pag 13). «Radio sees the most impact on listening from iPod/digital audio player owners age 11-24. Among 12-17s and 18-24s, 18 percent in each age group say they are spending less time with over-the-air radio due to time spent with an iPodlportable MP3 player»

Mark Ramsey diz o óbvio, mas explica-o bem:

«The fact is that time doesn't expand, folks. As listeners have more options for their audio entertainment time those new options will unquestionably crowd out listening to more established options. Isn't this exactly why time spent listening (an Arbitron measure, not an opinion survey one) has declined over the past few years - especially among younger demos where such audio entertainment options are most used? Don't believe everything you read. (...)Three things:

First, change always comes at the margin. So the conclusion that most folks DON'T do something obscures the obvious trend - that more folks DO do something. As the study notes: "Thirty percent of Americans age 12 and older own an iPod or other brand of portable MP3 player; this figure has risen from 22 percent in 2006 and 14 percent in 2005. More than half (54 percent) of those age 12-17 own a digital audio player." It is inconceivable that this statistic will not impact radio listening and Arbitron's own TSL data (along with my research data) indicate that these demos are the most at risk.

Second, listeners do not consciously consider trends in their listening so it is invalid to ask such questions and make sweeping conclusions about the impact - or lack thereof - of new audio options on radio listening. Let the results - the behaviors - speak for themselves. And those behaviors are clearly recorded in Arbitron diaries and via PPM.

Third, as I read these stats - and even if I believe in their veracity - for every two iPod owners who say they're not listening less to radio, about one says they ARE listening less.

When mp3 player owners comprise thirty percent of the audience, that should give us all pause.» («"Relax, iPods don't hurt Radio"», 20/04/07, Hear2.0)

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